Photoset

Sep 18, 2014
@ 11:00 pm
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85 notes

Jada Pinkett Smith graces ‘HEALTH’ magazine October 1, 2014 issue

(Source: midniwithmaddy, via scandal-whipped)


Photoset

Sep 18, 2014
@ 4:58 pm
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365 notes

nikkisshadetree:

sale-aholic:

"I’m not saying that it’s not still a young world for women, I mean, 16 to 25 is still a great opportunity, but the category for 40 and over isn’t what it was considered before. It’s more en vogue to see women in their 40s not considered geriatric!" - Lucy Liu in Schon magazine 2014

She looks GOOD!

SLAY

(Source: fyeahlucyliu)


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Sep 18, 2014
@ 4:53 pm
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833 notes

So the NFL succumbed to… beer pressure.

JON STEWART, on reports that the Minnesota Vikings reversed their decision to not suspend child abuser Adrian Peterson only after major league sponsor Anheuser Busch said they were “not yet satisfied” with how the NFL handled the case, on The Daily Show.

Stewart adds, “How crazy is this — a company that sells alcohol is the moral touchstone of the NFL… Maybe one of the only substances that is proven scientifically to increase the likelihood of domestic abuse — that company is saying to the NFL, ‘You’ve got a real problem here.”

Yep.

(via inothernews)

(via sgolitz)


Link

Sep 18, 2014
@ 4:44 pm
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133 notes

this JUST happened »

thisislucreziasand:

so u kno how i’m talking about how POC in the graphic design industry have it tough? we force representation because otherwise everyone would be white all the time.

my designer friend put an asian man in one of the images (he creates facebook graphics for a major…


Photoset

Sep 18, 2014
@ 4:41 pm
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622 notes

micdotcom:

Watch: Jon Stewart delivers the NFL takedown we’ve all been waiting for 

(GIFs via -teesa-)


Link

Sep 18, 2014
@ 4:27 pm
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2 notes

Police: Jonathan Dwyer head-butted wife and broke her nose »


Link

Sep 18, 2014
@ 12:13 pm
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Ron Rivera: “We don’t need to blame people, we need to find answers” »

I hope they are seeing that this is more than a revised NFL policy and actually start to make some changes. 

(Source: back-of-the-bus, via miaadamswhat)


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Sep 18, 2014
@ 8:24 am
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BREAKING: Three candidates vie to be first openly gay men elected to Georgia General Assembly - LGBT Georgia | Gay Georgia | Gay Atlanta | LGBT Atlanta »

thepoliticalfreakshow:

In the second week of January 2001, out lesbian Karla Drenner took office in State House District 85 covering Avondale Estates, becoming the first openly gay member of the Georgia General Assembly. Since then, two more lesbians joined the state legislature — Simone Bell in 2009 and Keisha Waites in 2012.

But no matter how many times they’ve tried, election year after election year, openly gay men have failed to get elected to the Gold Dome. The latest was Kyle Williams, who lost to Elena Parent in the Democratic primary for the Senate District 42 seat in May. Rashad Taylor came out while in office in 2011, but subsequently lost in his 2012 bid for re-election.

Three more openly gay men will try to make history in this November’s general election: Republican Christopher Deraney for House District 78 representing parts of Clayton County; Democrat Bob Gibeling for House District 54 in Buckhead; and Democrat Timothy Swiney for Senate District 9 in Gwinnett. Openly gay lawyer Randy New failed to get the required number of signed petitions in order to get on the ballot for House District 56.

Bob Gibeling

Bob Gibeling

Candidates’ sexuality isn’t coming up on the campaign trail

All three candidates say their sexual orientation has not come up in conversations with voters on the campaign trail.

“Not one time,” Deraney told the GA Voice. “The only people that have mentioned it to me are those that I’m closer to, those that I’ve brought into my circle, community members that I’ve gotten to know. But as far as knocking on doors, no one’s said anything.”

Gibeling, who’s received the endorsements of both Georgia Equality and the Victory Fund, says he’s been asked about his stance on LGBT issues, but not about his sexual orientation in particular.

Swiney, who lost in the race for House District 101 in 2012 and is in a tough fight again this year in a primarily Republican district, says LGBT voters talk to him about it but that overall people are most concerned with issues like taxes and health care.

Political experts break down ‘extremely complex’ issue

Political experts think it’s a mix of coincidence and demographics.

“It may have something to do with a specific kind of constituency within a district,” Charles Bullock, political science professor at the University of Georgia, told the GA Voice.

Christopher Deraney

Christopher Deraney

Steve Anthony, a lecturer in the political science department at Georgia State University, concurs, saying it has to do with whether the district is ready for an openly gay representative.

“It’s individual districts and it’s where those districts are that first determines the wisdom, so to speak, of if someone can come out and have a viable chance of winning,” he says.

Georgia Equality Executive Director Jeff Graham says the issue is “extremely complex” and points to a number of different factors why openly gay men always end up on the losing end in elections for the Georgia General Assembly.

The racial and gender composition of the districts and the local support beyond the LGBT community must be considered, he says, but “gay men have been elected to office in city councils in Georgia and many of the successful women candidates have also faced anti-gay rhetoric in their campaigns, so we do know that it’s not as simple as voters rejecting gay men in general.”

‘The overall problem is recruiting good candidates’

Swiney says that the quality of women who have won has just been better.

“I don’t think it’s a matter of gay men not getting the votes, it’s that more qualified women are running,” he says. “The overall problem is recruiting good candidates.”

Gibeling agrees on the quality of the candidates, calling the women “great pioneers in the political arena” and praising them for reaching across a broad spectrum of supporters.

However, Deraney thinks it goes deeper than that.

“I think it comes down to male perceptions, and how masculinity is perceived here in the South,” he says. “But in a district like mine, the issue hasn’t been brought up. I think I have a harder time down here as a Republican than as a gay man.”

State Rep. Karla Drenner points to the losing candidates and not their sexuality, saying they lost because they either ran against unbeatable incumbents or just didn’t run a good campaign.

“All of them have been extremely well funded it seems to me,” she says. “I just don’t think they did enough door-to-door stuff so people can get to know them.”

Timothy Swiney

Timothy Swiney

Candidates who happen to be gay, not just gay candidates

Overall, the candidates want to reiterate to people that they are people running for their respective seats who happen to be gay, not gay people running for their respective seats.

Swiney says he is running as a parent on issues that affect every family. Deraney is a champion of smaller government and what he calls “personal liberty.” Gibeling touts his business experience and faith-based background.

Bullock says Swiney and Deraney will have a rough road trying to come out on top come Election Day, and that Gibeling has a better shot in his race in Buckhead.

If it doesn’t happen for any of them and the Gold Dome drought continues, the experts still consider a win by an openly gay man to be an inevitability.

For more information on the candidates and their views, visit christopherjderaney.com,bobgibeling.com, and www.electtimothy.comAre you registered to vote? Do you know what polling location to go to on Nov. 4? Visit www.mvp.sos.ga.gov to check. Voter registration deadline is Oct 6, early voting begins Oct. 13 and the general election is on Nov. 4.

Source: Patrick Saunders for The GA Voice


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Sep 18, 2014
@ 8:11 am
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miaadamswhat:

dear-white-people:

We can bring the black “smart-house” back to American cinema y’all! Who will be there opening day?!

Me!

miaadamswhat:

dear-white-people:

We can bring the black “smart-house” back to American cinema y’all! Who will be there opening day?!

Me!

(via iknowwhythesongbirdsings)


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Sep 18, 2014
@ 8:02 am
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823 notes

The reasons Black women suffer disproportionately from abuse are complex. Racism and sexism are two of the biggest obstacles that Black women in America face. But because many Black women and men believe racism is a bigger issue than sexism, Black women tend to feel obligated to put racial issues ahead of sex-based issues. For Black women, a strong sense of cultural affinity and loyalty to community and race renders many of us silent, so our stories often go untold. One of the biggest related impediments is our hesitation in trusting the police or the justice system. As Black people, we don’t always feel comfortable surrendering “our own” to the treatment of a racially biased police state and as women, we don’t always feel safe calling police officers who may harm us instead of helping us. And when we do speak out or seek help, we too often experience backlash from members of our communities who believe we are airing out dirty laundry and making ourselves look bad in front of White people.

Access to employment and economic self-sufficiency are also important. Racism has a disparate impact on Black people, men especially, who have, for the past six decades, consistently been held to an unemployment rate almost double that of white men. In a society that measures “manhood” primarily by one’s ability to provide, being denied access to the means to provide can cause some men to seek power through dominating women. For some men, the venting of anger turns violent and their partners suffer the greatest blows. Black women also face employment disparities, earning less than Black men and White men and women. This wage disparity limits available options and leaves many women, particularly mothers, feeling trapped in bad relationships where financial needs trump all.

-from, 

Why Black Women Struggle More With Domestic Violence

(via wocinsolidarity)

(Source: diasporadash, via seveneaglestar)