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Apr 23, 2014
@ 2:09 pm
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details:

"It wasn’t fun. It wasn’t fun in any way… But it’s the kind of role you spend your life dreaming about" —Actress Naomie Harris on her latest project, Mandela: Long Walk to Freedom. The emotionally draining role earned her a spot as a 2013 Hollywood Maverick.

details:

"It wasn’t fun. It wasn’t fun in any way… But it’s the kind of role you spend your life dreaming about" —Actress Naomie Harris on her latest project, Mandela: Long Walk to Freedom. The emotionally draining role earned her a spot as a 2013 Hollywood Maverick.

(via theswordskissed)


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Apr 23, 2014
@ 1:26 pm
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Guns in bars? 7 'extreme' rules in new Georgia Law »

scandal-whipped:

Point by point, the new rules that permit guns in churches, schools, bars and government buildings.

Yup our dumb governor (I didn’t vote for his ass) signed this law.  This is a disaster waiting to happen.

(Source: NBCNews.com)


Photoset

Apr 23, 2014
@ 1:22 pm
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avocadogarden:

Avocado Egg Rolls with Creamy Cilantro Ranch Dip (recipe here)

(via iknowwhythesongbirdsings)


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Apr 23, 2014
@ 1:22 pm
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sous-latoureiffel:

Soooo beautiful! 

sous-latoureiffel:

Soooo beautiful! 

(via elegantpaws)


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Apr 23, 2014
@ 12:58 pm
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humansofnewyork:

"My best friend’s husband was a police officer who died in a shootout. For a few days, the media presented the story as a tragedy. Then I guess everyone got bored with that angle, because the story changed after a few days, and the media started reporting on the size of the insurance settlement my friend received. The story completely changed based on what they chose to focus on. I haven’t watched TV since."

humansofnewyork:

"My best friend’s husband was a police officer who died in a shootout. For a few days, the media presented the story as a tragedy. Then I guess everyone got bored with that angle, because the story changed after a few days, and the media started reporting on the size of the insurance settlement my friend received. The story completely changed based on what they chose to focus on. I haven’t watched TV since."


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Apr 23, 2014
@ 12:56 pm
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accras:

flowersgardenlove:

Purple Verbena Beautiful gorgeous pretty flowers

Deep purple

accras:

flowersgardenlove:

Purple Verbena Beautiful gorgeous pretty flowers

Deep purple


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Apr 23, 2014
@ 12:54 pm
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accras:

Healthy snacks list

accras:

Healthy snacks list

(via iknowwhythesongbirdsings)


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Apr 23, 2014
@ 12:51 pm
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Until the day she found herself checked in to Vanderbilt Hospital’s Psychiatric Center, Sarah Thomas referred to a drunken sexual assault at the end of her freshman year of college as simply a “very bad night.” When her psychiatrist instead used the R-word to discuss to the incident, she was taken aback.

"I never had considered myself a rape victim," Thomas wrote in a piece detailing her experience for xoJane. "Can you call it ‘rape’ if he makes you an omelet in the morning?"

In all, it took Thomas 10 years to fully acknowledge that the night was more than “a bad memory,” and to call the evening what it really was: rape.

Thomas’ story is familiar to many. Every year, thousands of young men and women have very bad nights. These are nights that legally fall within the definitions of rape or sexual assault, but because they weren’t violent, didn’t involve the heteronormative definition of sex or were so clouded by alcohol or fear that consent was never explicitly denied — are not characterized as a crime, even by the survivor.

The frequent confusion and denial surrounding sexual assault make up the basis of a forthcoming study in the journal Gender & Society, in which sociologist Heather Hlavka concludes that sexual violence and harassment are considered part of everyday life for many middle and high school-aged girls. Hlavka interviewed 100 youths between the ages of three and 17 years old, and found that they frequently wrote off harassment and abuse, noting the female subject “overwhelmingly described [it] as ‘normal stuff’ that ‘guys do.’”

Rape and sexual assault are among the most under-reported crimes in the world, but until now little consideration has been given to the fact that some survivors don’t report because they do not realize that they were raped in the first place.

When survivors don’t know they’ve been raped

Follow policymic

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Apr 23, 2014
@ 12:29 pm
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ethiopienne:

Sonia Sotomayor delivers blistering dissent against affirmative action ban

The Supreme Court upheld Michigan’s ban on affirmative action Tuesday, but not without a blistering dissent from Justice Sonia Sotomayor.
Sotomayor said the decision infringed upon groups’ rights by allowing Michigan voters to change “the basic rules of the political process … in a manner that uniquely disadvantaged racial minorities.”
"In my colleagues’ view, examining the racial impact of legislation only perpetuates racial discrimination," Sotomayor added. “This refusal to accept the stark reality that race matters is regrettable. As members of the judiciary tasked with intervening to carry out the guarantee of equal protection, we ought not sit back and wish away, rather than confront, the racial inequality that exists in our society.”
The court’s 6-2 decision upheld a voter-approved change to the Michigan state Constitution that prevents public colleges from using race as a factor in its admissions. As the AP noted, the ruling provides a boost for other education-related affirmative action bans in California and Washington state.
ABC News pointed out that Sotomayor has been open about the role affirmative action has played in her personal life. In her memoir “My Beloved World,” Sotomayor wrote that it “opened doors” for her.
"But one thing has not changed: to doubt the worth of minority students’ achievement when they succeed is really only to present another face of the prejudice that would deny them a chance even to try," she wrote.
Read Sotomayor’s full dissent here.

ethiopienne:

Sonia Sotomayor delivers blistering dissent against affirmative action ban

The Supreme Court upheld Michigan’s ban on affirmative action Tuesday, but not without a blistering dissent from Justice Sonia Sotomayor.

Sotomayor said the decision infringed upon groups’ rights by allowing Michigan voters to change “the basic rules of the political process … in a manner that uniquely disadvantaged racial minorities.”

"In my colleagues’ view, examining the racial impact of legislation only perpetuates racial discrimination," Sotomayor added. “This refusal to accept the stark reality that race matters is regrettable. As members of the judiciary tasked with intervening to carry out the guarantee of equal protection, we ought not sit back and wish away, rather than confront, the racial inequality that exists in our society.”

The court’s 6-2 decision upheld a voter-approved change to the Michigan state Constitution that prevents public colleges from using race as a factor in its admissions. As the AP noted, the ruling provides a boost for other education-related affirmative action bans in California and Washington state.

ABC News pointed out that Sotomayor has been open about the role affirmative action has played in her personal life. In her memoir “My Beloved World,” Sotomayor wrote that it “opened doors” for her.

"But one thing has not changed: to doubt the worth of minority students’ achievement when they succeed is really only to present another face of the prejudice that would deny them a chance even to try," she wrote.

Read Sotomayor’s full dissent here.

(via nikkisshadetree)